Posts Tagged 'pennsylvania'

Daniel Warren Smeal 1886 – 1955

Daniel Warren Smeal died February 18, 1955, in Morgan Run, Boggs Township, Clearfield County, PA.

He was born December 5, 1886 at West Decatur, Clearfield County, Pa. the son of Collis E. Smeal and Lydia Ann (Fee) Smeal.

On November 21 1906 he married Bessie Ann Haines, a daughter of Thomas Haines and Margaret “Maggie” (Richner) Haines. Daniel and Bessie had two children: Beatrice Orelena, and Arthur. They also had an adopted daughter Lillian E. Waller Smeal.

Daniel is buried in the Sanborn Cemetery.

Daniel Warren Smeal and Bessie Ann (Haines) Smeal were my great-granduncle and great-grandaunt. Bessie was an older sister of my great-grandmother Hanna Jane “Jennie” Haines.

I have included Daniel Warren Smeal’s obituary which appeared in the Clearfield Progress, February 19, 1955 Page 3.

Daniel Warren Smeal obituary

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Matthew Scouten Ogden Sr. 1777 – 1852

Today is the 236th anniversary of the birth of Matthew Scouten Ogden Sr. He was a son of Daniel Ogden and Helena Eleanor Scouten (there are many variant spellings for Helena’s surname.) Matthew was born February 17, 1777 in Cherry Valley, Montgomery County, New York, the eighth of Nine children. Matthew was my 5th great-grandfather.

Depending on what text you read on the subject of the Cherry Valley Massacre, the Ogden’s either left just before the attack, or they all escaped with their lives but lost their possessions. What we know for certain is that they managed to survive and eventually Matthew wound up in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania.

Matthew was married on June 30, 1802 to Elizabeth Bloom daughter of William Bloom Sr. and Mary Mettler, theirs was the first white marriage in the county, and was performed by “Squire” Arthur Bell at Philipsburg.

Matthew and Elizabeth had a total of 17 children, 14 of whom reached adulthood, they were: Jonathan, William, Infant, Abraham, Infant, Mercy, Daniel, Mary, Nancy, Eleanor, Elizabeth, Matthew Jr., Rebeccah, Hannah Bloom, Susannah Jane, David and Miriam.

Matthew died in 1852 in Clearfield and is buried in the Old Clearfield Cemetery, with his wife, Elizabeth (Bloom) Ogden who passed away September 18, 1875 in Curwensville, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. Matthew’s father Daniel is also buried in the same cemetery.

I have personally done very little research on the Ogden family, I would love to hear from other members of the Ogden family and exchange information, stories and photos with you.

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Johannes George KNAUF 1811 – 1878

Johannes George Knauf, my 4th great-grandfather, was born 202 years ago today February 16, 1811 in Vollmerz, Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany. He was a son of Johannes George Knauf and Kunigunda BISHOP. Johannes lived with his parents until 1833. On April 18, 1833 Johannes was married to Anna Barbara Dreitz, who was to have been pregnant with their first child, Margaret. They left Germany and arrived at the port of Boston on September 30, 1833. From there they migrated to Butler County, Pa. and again moved to Indiana County, PA settling near Trade City in 1837 where they engaged in farming. Anna passed away in 1851, and Johannes raised their children himself. Johannes remarried in March 25, 1862, to Louise Kinter, who was a widow. Johannes passed way April 22, 1878 at Trade City, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. He was buried in the Mahoning Union Cemtery in Marchand, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. He was 62 years old when he died.

If you are related to Johannes, have any photos or additional information for him or his family I would love to hear from you, and exchange information.

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Raymond Willis Bloom 1916 – 1974

On this day February 13, 1974 Raymond Willis Bloom passed away.

Raymond Willis Bloom was born January 3, 1916 in Madera, Clearfield County, PA, the son of Willis and Mae Cornelia (Brown) Bloom.

On February 15, 1937 he was married Dorothy Margaret Bush, a daughter of Charles Arthur and Hanna Jane “Jennie” (Haines) Bush, in the Ohio Church, West Decatur, PA.

To this union five children were born: Albert Raymond, Thomas, Dora, Howard and Mildred.

Raymond passed away February 13, 1974 in the Philipsburg State General Hospital, Centre County, PA. He was buried in the Mt. Zion Cemetery, Olanta, Clearfield County, PA.

Raymond Willis Bloom was my grand-uncle, I never had the opportunity to get to know him, but the family always speaks highly of Uncle Raymond. He was a hard working man, who genuinely cared for his family. I have included his obituary which was published in the Clearfield Progress, February 14, 1974 Page 10.

Raymong Willias Bloom Obituary

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Researching Pays Off…

I would like to share a genealogy research story with my Bush cousins. Last week I was researching the Bush family in Pocahontas county Iowa. I was doing my usual, searches on Ancestry, Family Search, and Newspaper Archives, when I found a record relating to Carolyn Jane Peterson who married a Mr. Charlton. I will call him Mr. Charlton to protect his privacy due to the fact that he is still alive and well. Through the course of researching Carolyn I found a marriage record which listed her husband’s name. I always track down all of the records at my disposal for spouses of relatives, but this time I could not find a death record for Mr. Charlton. I decided to do a google search for him. Being that I had Carolyn’s death record, I had the last place they were known to live, so I included that in my search. I ended up finding him listed on a website offering classes to the community in which he lives. While I was not absolutely certain I had the right fellow I took a shot and sent him an email.

After a few days I gave up hope of him ever replying to my email. A couple of more days passed, and wouldn’t you know it, he replied. He told me that he was in fact who I thought he was, and proceeded to give me a little background on his deceased wife. He then told me that Carolyn’s mother had written a family history paper of sorts called “Bush Roots”. Carolyn’s mother was Minnie Mary Bush, or Minna as she was known to friends and family, and she wrote the Bush history as she recalled it in 1979. Mr. Charlton’s current wife scanned the essay and emailed a copy to me.

In the introduction Minna discusses how the book and movie “Roots” had made her think of her own family history. What an interesting little tidbit, I wonder how many others in the late 70’s had the same idea and began tracing their own family histories? In the essay she begins with family lore, keep in mind she was born in 1898 and was recalling most of this from memory at the age of 81. She tells of the history of the Bush family, discussing her parents and her fathers siblings. From what I have seen she had most, if not all of the facts straight. I am still comparing her version of the family story to the data I have compiled over the past 20 years. The most interesting part is that at least Minna’s generation were still aware of their Pennsylvania roots. Most of the Bush family members and researchers I have corresponded with concerning the branches that moved to Iowa were not aware of the tie to Pennsylvania. It is funny how over the course of a generation or two, significant details like that can become lost to a family. For that reason documents such as the one Minna so graciously left for us to uncover become that much more important.

There is a section on the lineage of Elizabeth Morris Otis, with some details I have never heard before. I can’t say that what she writes is true but I hope it is because it may just help to narrow down who her parent’s were. As genealogists we gather info from wherever we can and use that info to make educated decisions about what record to look at next, and she has given some mighty interesting clues to follow up on. She recalls according to family Lore that Elizabeth Morris Otis was brought to this country around 1813 when she was very young. In the 1900 census Elizabeth says she immigrated in 1818 at the age of 5 or 6. Minna states that Elizabeth came to the USA with her grandparents and a sister. I have known for about 10 years that she came with her grandfather John Morris who we find in the 1820 – 1850 census’. The part about Elizabeth’s grandmother and a sister was not known to me until today. It does help to explain why John Morris is listed in the 1820 census of Centre County to be living with two children both under the age of 16 and a woman of the same approximate age as he is. Next up is a little tidbit which really catches my attention, Minna states that Elizabeth’s father was a doctor, and that he was killed while serving in the army. This could prove to be a valuable piece of info for finding her father as we now have a clue as to where to look. Then again, it may not offer any help at all since we still don’t have a name to go with it. As far as I can figure, if Minna is correct, then Elizabeth’s father would have likely been serving in the Napoleonic Wars, and we do know that England was involved in that conflict. There is no doubt a lot of research to be done with this info but it just may provide us with enough clues to figure out who her parents were.

The rest of the essay is chocked full of little stories, mostly concerning her parents and her remembrances of them. She talks a lot about her father and his favorite pass-times. She also talks about an attempted poisoning of a young child by a young second wife. There is a story about the near purchase of an egg-sucking hunting dog, that includes an explanation of why a slip of the lip in her family earns the nickname of “Old, Egg-sucker”. She talks a bit about the depression, the first phonograph in the family and women smoking clay pipes. This essay is filled with precious memories, funny witticisms, and valuable information. All I can say is I am very happy to have had it sent to me.

I am waiting for word from Mr. Charlton as to whether or not he is comfortable with my posting the essay here on my website for all of the Bush cousins to read and use in their research endeavors. I have also asked if he still has his first wife’s photo collection or anything else he would consider sharing. I hope that he does, but if not the essay was a wonderful gift, unknowing left to the rest of us by a curious woman that watched “Roots” and decided she wanted to know more about her roots. I am so very thankful that she took the time to write it all down so that it could be shared 30 years later by others who are curious to know where they came from.

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